Skyzoo – Music For My Friends Album Review

Purists have rightfully lamented the lack of identity in New York hip-hop in recent years. Luckily, Skyzoo doesn’t need to, as they say, “bring New York back”. He already embodies it.

His latest LP, Music For My Friends, is an ode to everything that molds us: our environment, our era, the company we keep. In Skyzoo’s case, the album is a peek into the formative years of an 80s Brooklyn baby, during which innocence was tainted, but not altogether lost, and nature took a backseat to nurture. The 16-track opus only reinforces the notion that for better or for worse, we are all products of our respective habitats.

In depicting the elements of the Skyzoo equation, the MC tells tales of relentless pursuit of money, happiness and everything in between. If “Luxury” and the “erroneously” titled “Suicide Doors” are any indication, luxury is the endgame, as it once was for Sky’s neighborhood elders, a teenage pipe dream, but one within reach nonetheless. While “The Moments That Matter” preaches living in the now, “Money Makes Us Happy” delves into carpe diem‘s inevitable ceiling and the duplicitous nature of the paper chase. As for the means of materializing their street dreams, Sky and his crew know fully well that slinging dope is a dangerously easy fix. On the Jadakiss-assisted “See a Key (Ki’)”, Skyzoo almost innocently flirts with that temptation and on “Asking Bodie For a Package”, details the road to succumbing to it. Sadly, the youthful recklessness and childlike abandon that fueled Sky’s adolescence also spawned some casualties, with the wordsmith paying homage to them on “Things I Should’ve Told My Friends”. Lyrically, the Brooklynite’s rhyme scheme is complex and the wordplay singularly cryptic. But for all the evidence of lyrical mastery, Music For My Friends is best summarized by one no-frills bar on “All Day, Always”: “All the shit we saw is what we all became.”

The nostalgia in Skyzoo’s lyrics is mostly echoed by the production, but never more so than on MarcNfinit’s horn-laced “Suicide Doors” and soul-sampling “The Experience”. Longtime collaborator !llmind contributes four tracks, all of which, in serving the LP’s focus, veer away from the “boom trap” sound that made his name. On “Money Makes Us Happy”, The Rvlt.’s piano and drum loops add a blissful, yet regretful tone to Skyzoo, Black Thought and Bilal’s musings. In short, the album’s sound is reminiscent of a bygone era, as it should be, but remains far from dated. Echos of New York are heard primarily through samples, but are sometimes absent, meaning the beats occasionally fail the LP’s primary vision. Therefore, the album isn’t “bringing New York back”, but it still satiates both old and new hip-hop heads.

Ultimately, Music For My Friends is audible evidence of the cloth from which Skyzoo and his running mates are cut. Nostalgia abounds, but regret is seldom heard. In essence, Sky’s childhood stories of hustling, chasing dreams and toying with disaster only epitomize the notion that we are what we come from.

Grade: 8/10

Gems: Suicide Doors, See a Key (Ki’) ft. Jadakiss, Money Makes Us Happy ft. Black Thought & Bilal, Civilized Leisure ft. Mozaic, The Experience, Asking Bodie For a Package ft. Skarr Akbar

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